Top Tips for Amazing Confetti Photos

Top Tips for Amazing Confetti Photos

I LOVE CONFETTI! There’s one simple rule here: MORE IS MORE. There is no such thing as too much confetti. However, you will need to check with your venue if they have any rules on it. Even if they don’t have any restrictions, it’s always best to opt for biodegradable confetti – for the planet maaaaaaan! (The planet, and David.) Now, I’ve really thought about this because I love it so so much, so prepare for the ultimate guide to wedding confetti by a true confetti connoisseur:

bride and groom walk through evening colourful confetti tunnel at voewood house wedding

What is the Best Kind of Wedding Confetti?

The best kind of confetti is brightly coloured and fairly large in size. This ensures that you will have photos showing your brightly coloured confetti slowly fluttering down around you and your beau. Generally the larger the confetti piece, the slower it will fall through the air, so it needs to be approximately 2cm diameter.

Confetti that works really well:

  • Brightly coloured tissue paper
  • Flower petals of mixed size and various colours

Things that don’t work well:

  • Rice (looks shit and bloats pigeons, no one likes a bloated pigeon)
  • Lavender
  • Tiny broken up dried flower pieces in a dark colour
  • Bubbles (if you’re dead set on bubbles, get a a few bubble machines to create LOADS)

How Much Wedding Confetti Will You Need?

When you’re ordering your confetti, order enough confetti for each guest to grab a really big handful. If you are buying your confetti in volume and thinking HOW MUCH CONFETTI DO I NEED?!??!!, then a good guideline is 2 litres of confetti for every 10 guests.

A side view of a hand holding brightly coloured wedding confetti. Image by Parrot and Pineapple

Most of all – you do not need to put your confetti in little cones or bags. Get a nice basket or bucket, drop it all in and then get your wedding squad to walk up and down the confetti tunnel asking your guests to take a handful. Cones and bags are an added expense, you may have to spend a lot of time before the wedding filling them and they also really confuse your guests when it comes to throwing (more people than you can imagine just panic and throw the bag / cone, which is MUCH less photogenic lemme tell you. Also, you end up with loads of confetti still in cones / bags – it’s useless there. You want it all in the air raining down on you!)

wedding guests gather round a woman distributing confetti from a box at a wedding. Image by Parrot and Pineapple

 

Consider a Confetti Canon

The best confetti throwing technique is simply just having a handful of confetti and throwing it over arm (like shooting a hoop in basketball or netball) so it rains down on to you and your wedded beau as you skip through the tunnel. As a confetti specialist, I can say that height is absolutely key to a confetti blizzard. If you want a really next level confetti experience, then I can highly recommend investing in some confetti canons. They are BRILLIANT. 

If your confetti is in cones or bags people tend to throw directly from the cone or open bag, which often becomes airborne too! (Again, as a confetti specialist I can confidently say that no one wants a confetti cone thrown at their face on their wedding day.) The best case scenario is that all your guests hold on to their confetti cone or bag when throwing, but even then the confetti doesn’t get the same height and velocity as when it’s just handheld. Trust me, I’ve really thought about the physics behind this. Don’t even consider confetti cones or bags. 

The Best Time for Confetti

Organising the confetti shot is one of only two parts of the day where I will step up and direct your guests. The confetti moment is best done immediately after the ceremony, before you’ve had a chance for all your guests to greet you after the service. After you have been pronounced married and walked out of your ceremony you should both try to step in to a side room, or anywhere away from the crowd. Not only is it nice to spend that time together as just the two of you – you just got MARRIED! – but it also allows your guests to filter out of the ceremony, and for me to organise them in two lines prepped and ready to go. It takes approximately 10-15 minutes to organise depending on how many guests you have – the more guests you have, the longer they take to organise.

After Your Confetti Moment

Once your confetti moment is done you should allow for some time to mingle with your guests. Your guests will be immensely happy for you and they can’t wait to hug you and tell you how amazing you are. You should make some space for that love and well wishing, I recommend to make space for about 30 minutes AFTER the confetti tunnel (depending on the number of guests you have, 30ish minutes is good for approx 100 guests to tell you how awesome you are). 

My Favourite Confetti Suppliers

Shropshire Petals – Naturally grown range of dried petals

Your Confetti – Pick and mix paper confetti in bright colours, circles and hearts

And not forgetting the grow your own option! Lots of couples will task their green fingered friends and family with growing and drying rose petals to make your own confetti. 

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Top Tips for Amazing and Easy Family Group Photos

Top Tips for Amazing and Easy Family Group Photos

When you work with me as your wedding photographer, your family group photos (which are the more formal ones with your family in a line-up) are entirely led by you and what you’d like from the day. While they’re definitely not everyone’s favourite part of the day (including mine, I like the action!) I do tend to find that they’re often the ones that are downloaded and / or bought as framed prints. They lend themselves well to going up on the mantelpiece at home and make excellent gifts! However, approach with caution because they can also take up a large part of your day, if you’re not careful. I’m happy to follow your lead on what you want from them, so here are my tips on how to make the process of taking them easy peasey lemon squeezey AND get some really lovely photos that you’ll definitely want in a printed in a frame. 

family group gather outside a church for a wedding photo and two children scoot away from the group towards the camera. Photo by Fun Wedding Photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

The golden rule with these photos is that less is definitely more. You will need to be in almost every photos, so you need to consider very carefully – and prioritise – your experience of having these taken on the day. The more variations and arrangements that you have, the longer you will spend standing and smiling at a camera when you could be mingling with your guests instead.

A Guideline Wedding Photography Checklist

As a guideline, here’s a pretty standard list of the groups couples tend go for. You can take from this what you need: 

  • You and your partner with your extended family (grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins etc)
  • You and your partner with your immediate family (parents and siblings)
  • You and your partner with your partner’s immediate family (parents and siblings)
  • You and your partner with your partner’s extended family (grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins, etc)
  • The wedding party – you and your partner with your wedding squad
  • You with your wedding helpers
  • Your partner and their wedding helpers

It takes approximately 4 minutes per group photo arrangement (so you can see how it tots up quite quickly!) – for example, this list would take approximately 30 minutes to photograph. If you want lots of variations on group photos, then your wish is my command – but you need to make sure you factor in enough time for them to happen.

group photograph of all guests at a cultural fusion wedding

Scheduling in your Family Group Photos to Your Wedding Day

The best time to take the group photos is after your ceremony, but before your food is served. It’s nice to get them ticked off the list of things you have to do, so that you can start relaxing in to your day. It also means people won’t be so rowdy that they can’t be instructed – which leads me onto my next point…

Making Family Group Photos Easy

With no disrespect to your nearest and dearest, getting everyone together and ready for the group photos can be a bit like herding cattle. The most efficient way to get the groups organised and ready for their close-up is to nominate one person from each side of the family to be the herder, gathering everyone together so that everyone’s there when they need to be. So, you’ll need someone from your wedding party that knows your family members, and someone from your partner’s side that knows their family members. Give these helpers the list of family members that you want in each photo, so they know who they’re rounding up. I will then work with your nominated helper to make things flow so easily that the whole she-bang will be over before you know it. And then you can get back to the love, hugs, mingling and CANAPÉS! 

 

Top Tips for Family Group Photos

  • Be realistic with the number of group photo variations that you want
  • Plan time for your group photos to happen (approx 4 minutes per arrangement)
  • Ask someone in your family to help gather the right people, get your partner to do the same
  • Plan for the group photos to be taken after the ceremony but before the meal

Finally – it’s worth saying that some of my favourite group photos are most often the spontaneous, late night, dance floor fuelled big huggy group photos. If and when they ever pop up, I’ll be sure to dive in and capture the moment.

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Top Tips for Amazing Photos of your Wedding Ceremony

Top Tips for Amazing Photos of your Wedding Ceremony

This is the second post in my series on top tips for getting amazing wedding photography. In this post I am going to share with you exactly how I shoot a wedding ceremony and give you all my advice for ensuring that your wedding ceremony photos are exactly what you want. So without further ado, read on!

Wedding ceremonies are, of course, beautiful and poignant and emotional and euphoric, but most of all they are a legal process (unless you’re having a Humanist ceremony, but this is still the first four things). Whether you are having a religious ceremony or a civil service, I will always go and introduce myself to the person leading the ceremony. It’s usually quite obvious from the giant cameras swinging from my hips, but I find this really helps to create open communication between the two of us and allows me to negotiate any rules they may have. As the registrar or religious leader is always the person in charge of the wedding ceremony, it’s a good idea to ask them about restrictions on photography before you book. Every person and location will be different. Some are very relaxed and allow me to move around and photograph freely – which I will always do with the utmost care and respect. Others will have strict rules, like the photographer having to stand in one position and not move, or the photographer only being allowed to photograph only from the back. If you find this information out in advance of booking your service it will both help you make decisions about what you want from your photos, and help your photographer work out how to play it.

Bride and groom during their wedding ceremony. By feminist wedding photographer Parrot & PIneapple.

To alleviate any worries, my cameras work with a silent shutter function – so no awful clickclickclickclickclickclicking – and I never use flash during a ceremony because it can feel really disruptive. Basically, I try to be as ninja-like as possible! My aim is that you and your guests don’t notice me, and I can photograph your ceremony as it proceeds naturally – all the big, epic moments and all the fleeting ones in between too.

Speaking of the worry of disruptive cameras, unplugged ceremonies are a popular choice, and you may want to consider one. This is where couples ask all their guests to leave their phones, cameras and iPads in their bags and refrain from taking photos. There are some big benefits to doing this;

  • Your guests get to enjoy the moment of you getting married instead of viewing it from behind a camera.
  • Your official photos are better because you can see your guests faces and reactions, instead of them being hidden behind a screen, or distracted by a large glowing rectangle.
  • You will feel less pressure entering your ceremony without 20 cameras being pointed at you.
  • You won’t hear the constant clicking of cameras as you get married
  • You won’t have photos from your day uploaded to social media before your evening guests arrive. All of my photos will be free to share and distribute among your guests once they’re ready – I’ll deliver you a handful of highlights within the first week for the keen beans!

If you’re wondering how couples enter the ceremony room, I’ve seen loads of variations; some couples come in together, some enter separately and ask their parents to accompany them, some people walk in entirely by themselves, and some choose to be given away (by their father/mother/sibling/dog). There are no rules and you should go for whatever feels right for you. Well, when I said there were no rules, I lied: the only rule is that when entering the ceremony room, you need to leave plenty of space between you and person walking in front of you. I want to be able to get a lovely photograph of you walking in to the wedding ceremony!

Top tips for getting amazing photos of your wedding ceremony :

  • Ask your ceremony venue about their restrictions on photography.
  • Plan to walk slowly down the aisle with your head up. If you are meeting your partner at the top, keep your eyes on them. It’ll help with nerves.
  • Leave plenty of space between each person entering the ceremony. If you want photos of each person entering, I need to be able to see them. It also helps build the anticipation of your entry.
  • If you are doing a first kiss, let that linger for at least 2 seconds, then I can ensure I have captured it. Lots of couples hug immediately after the kiss which really helps to diffuse nerves!

 

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Top tips for amazing photos of you getting ready

Top tips for amazing photos of you getting ready

Getting ready is usually an extremely exciting start to an extremely exciting day ahead! However, it’s also the first time that I’m meeting most of your party, and lots of folk won’t be fully ready for the day yet. For this reason, I start the day off by shooting slowly – I know there’s literally nothing worse than having a camera in your face first thing in the morning, so I like to ease you in. I’m nice like that.

For brides, I generally arrive at the getting ready location between one and two hours before you’re due to leave; this gives me plenty of time to get all the key shots without overwhelming you. We’re talking nice, relaxed shots of your hair and make-up being done, you getting into your wedding gladrags, and some of the general ambience too.

Speaking of glad rags (the handbags come later) – you should aim to be putting your outfit on 30 minutes before you’re due to leave. Though this may seem keen, it means you have plenty of time to do it up without rushing and risking getting make-up on the fabric or ruining your hair! Depending on how many buttons your outfit has, it takes approximately 15 minutes to get your outfit on; this leaves 15 minutes for your family and friends to bask in your fully-dressed glory, and for finishing touches like shoes and any veils or headpieces. Ask your wedding squad to be ready 45 minutes before you are due to leave so that they have time to help you with your finishing touches and leaving.

What that time should not be spent doing is worrying about the tidiness of where we are. When I shoot anyone getting ready one of the first things that most people will say to me is “I’m sorry but it’s a mess in here”. No need to apologise! Getting ready for a wedding can be chaotic, and with chaos comes mess. It’s nice to tidy away uneaten food and dirty plates, but I can work around everything else!

In fact, we’re aiming for you to not be worrying on your wedding morning at all. This is why it’s a good idea to plan it out, just like you have for the ceremony and reception. You don’t want to have to think about anything other than getting ready for your wedding and enjoying yourself, so if there are things that need to be done on the wedding morning, give clearly defined jobs to your wedding squad in advance. After all, that’s why you have a wedding party! You want to make sure that you haven’t got anything else to think about other than getting ready to get married – and they want to help you.

To plan it effectively, start with the end in mind and work backwards through all the steps. List out all the jobs and delegate everything (and I really do mean EVERYTHING) that you don’t need to do or be involved in. I promise you, you’ll feel a million times better for it on the day.

On to the boys! To photograph a groom getting ready I will arrive about an hour before you are due to leave. I generally ask guys to get their trousers and shirt on, then I will photograph the finishing touches like ties, bow ties, button holes, etc. It goes without saying that if you want me to photograph you giving presents to your helpers, or anything else that’s significant, then you will need to hold off giving them out until I arrive. Again, if there are jobs to be done on the wedding morning, delegate as much as possible to your wedding helpers. It’s what they’re there for after all (as well as drinking with you, obviously…)

Top tips:

  • Start with the end in mind and work backwards through the steps to create your running ‘to-do’ list.
  • Ask your hair and make up artist to have you finished 30 minutes before you are due to leave.
  • DELEGATE as much a possible.
  • Have a final check list to run through before you leave to make sure you have everything you will need. This might include the keys to wherever you are staying on your wedding night, any speech or reading you are giving, the rings (if they are your responsibility), a change of shoes if you plan to, a jacket if you have one.
  • Leave your phone at home. It’s just another thing for you to think about on your day.
  • A crochet hook will make light work of a button up gown.
  • Your flowers will arrive from the florist in water. Have kitchen roll or an old tea towel on hand to blot them dry so you don’t drip water all over your snazzy outfit.

Want to see more helpful wedding planning tips and advice? Check these out:

 

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How to plan your wedding day timeline

How to plan your wedding day timeline

Mastering how to plan your wedding day timeline can be a tricky beast to tackle. There’s several moving parts to come together, and very often you need the benefit of experience to know how long a specific part of your wedding will take. And that’s where I come in! As a wedding photographer I get the privilege of observing in great detail about 30 weddings a year – and lots of those weddings are very different and unique in their styling and format. However the one thing that binds them all together is how long each individual part takes. So here’s my mix and match guide to mapping out your wedding day timeline!

4 men wearing green wedding suits stride towards the camera.

The Average Wedding Day Timeline

From my experience, the average wedding lasts about 8 hours from just before the ceremony to just after the first dance. It probably seems like a long time, but quite a few different things happen in that time which break it all up. Plus that old saying really is true – time flies when you’re having fun.

Get Started with a Wedding Day Schedule

Working out your wedding day schedule starts with marking out the main event – firstly, what time is your ceremony? This is the main anchor to your wedding day schedule. If you are having a civil ceremony then you will be required to arrive at your ceremony venue between 25 and 15 minutes before your ceremony start time for an interview. Your registrar will tell you what time they need you to arrive.

a bride and her bridesmaids walk in to marylebone town hall wedding ceremony.

If you are having a religious wedding ceremony then the person leading the ceremony will tell you what time each of you need to arrive. There is generally no need for an interview – but the religious leader may need you to complete other formalities before the ceremony takes place.

For any kind of wedding ceremony, either civil or religious, I would recommend telling your wedding guests to arrive 30 minutes before it is due to start. This allows time for your guests to chat to each other, be greeted by one of you (or one of your wedding helpers) and get themselves settled before the ceremony starts.

mother of the bride is greeted by groom at london wedding ceremony.

For example, if your civil wedding ceremony is due to start at 2pm, then tell your guests to arrive at 1.30pm. One of you (or one of your wedding helpers) will need to be at the ceremony venue at the same time to meet everyone. You will also need to have your interviews before, which could start at 1.45pm and then 1.50pm. 

Timing the Wedding Day Preparation

Once you know what time you need to arrive at your wedding ceremony, you can begin to work out what needs to happen before the ceremony. This part of the day can be fairly hectic, so it’s really helpful to have it planned out in the same way that you plan the rest of the day. The wedding morning works really well when it’s planned backwards. Start with the time that you need to arrive for your wedding ceremony and take off how long it will take you to travel to the ceremony – remember to leave some wriggle room for bad traffic.

bride and groom walk across a city road to a registry office wedding after being dropped off by a taxi

For example if you need to be at your wedding ceremony at 1.45pm, for a 2pm start, and it takes 30 minutes to get there, you need to leave at 1.05pm (allowing for 10 minutes of delay contingency time – it’s better to do a couple of rounds of the block rather than risk being late). 

There is generally quite a lot of excitement in those moments before you leave. So give yourself some time to enjoy that moment. I would aim to be completely ready 15 minutes before leaving so you can enjoy the fizz (or even some fizz!). Plus, if you want any photos of your family and friends seeing you for the first time, you will need some time for that. The last thing on your getting ready action list should be putting your outfit on – and this can be quite a production! If you are wearing a wedding dress, or equally anything that needs to carefully put on, give yourself at least 15 minutes to do so, more if you are also having a veil. Tiny buttons can take a long time to do up! If you are having a make up artist and / or hairdresser to help you get ready for your wedding, let them know what time you want your hair and make up to be finished. They will be able to advise you on what time you will need to start.

father gets choked up as he sees his daughter as bride for the first time at voewood house wedding

For example, if you are scheduling to leave at 1.05pm, you need to aim to be completely ready to leave by 12.50pm. If you are wearing a wedding dress, you will need to put that on at 12.35pm. This means your hair and make up needs to finish by 12.30pm, and your wedding helpers need to be completely ready by the same time (to help you!).   

bride is helped in to her wedding dress by two bridesmaids wearing green at anran farm wedding

Wedding Ceremony Timings

Now that you have a good idea of how the wedding morning all fits together, you can start thinking about your wedding in a normal chronological order. The length of a wedding ceremony is dictated by what kind of ceremony you are having – and ceremonies come in all shapes and sizes. Below is a rough guide to how long each kind of ceremony takes:

  • Civil ceremonies – Between 20 and 40 minutes depending on how many readings and music you have
  • Religious ceremonies – At least 45 minutes, depending on what kind of religious blessing you have and if there is any readings or music.
  • Humanist ceremonies and celebrant led ceremonies – Usually between 20 and 45 minutes, again depending many readings and how much music you want. These kind of ceremonies are the most creative and allow you to really craft something that works for you as a couple. Check out Nat Rayboulds Weds for more info.

For example, if you are having a civil ceremony that starts at 2pm, with two readings, then it will take approximately 30 minutes and finish at 2.30pm.

bride and groom stand at the front of timber walled room in coventry registry office exchanging vows.

How Long Does Confetti Take?

I absolutely LOVE confetti – so if your wedding venues allow you to do it, I would highly recommend planning a confetti moment. In terms of your wedding day schedule, adding confetti to the occasion depends on how many guests you are having. The more guests you have, the longer it will take them to move around between locations (and this is true for all elements of your wedding day – large volumes of people move slowly). Confetti moments are orchestrated by getting everyone in to two lines, getting the confetti distributed and ready to throw. Here’s my rough timings guide for organising the confetti moment right through to you and your beau skipping down the tunnel of fluttering glee. These are based on the number of guests that you plan to have, and can be considerably squeezed by having a team of wedding helpers who are absolutely ON IT in terms of ushering your guests along.

  • 20 or less guests – maximum of five minutes
  • 20 to 80ish guests – Approximately 10 minutes
  • Over 80 guests – between 15 and 25 minutes

For example, if you are getting married at a registry office and have around 50 guests, and will have you confetti immediately after your ceremony finishes at 2.30pm, then your confetti will be finished by 2.40pm

bride and groom hold hands in the air while walking down steps at islington town hall getting showered in confetti

How Long Do Wedding Group Photos Take?

I tend to let couples decide how many family group arrangements they want. The most important thing to remember is that group photos take time, you will need to allocate enough time for all the group photos that you want. I find it takes me an average of 4 minutes to take one group photo arrangement – and this is usually with the help of your wedding helpers sourcing the various people for me.

bride and groom stand with bridesmaids and groomsmen laughing for a wedding party group photo

For a big group photo of all of your guests together, again, this takes longer than 4 minutes and entirely depends on how many guests you have.

  • 20 or less guests – approximately 5 minutes
  • 20 to 80ish guests – approximately 10 minutes
  • Over 100 guests – approximately 20 minutes

For example, if you want 5 family group arrangements then I would recommend to start these after you’ve had 15 minutes to hug and kiss your guests (and give yourself a break!). They would start at 2.55pm and finish at 3.15pm. 

group photograph of all guests at a cultural fusion wedding

How Long do Couple Portraits Take?

I am yet to meet a couple who is really excited about having their photograph taken for the couple portraits. And I can completely understand! However I tend to find that the couple portrait part of the day is a really nice way to step away from the energy of your wedding and just have some 1:1 time. You can make your couple portraits as epic and adventurous, or as simple and intimate as you like. I generally recommend that couples schedule about 20 minutes for some couple portraits to be taken during the day. If you fancy taking advantage of a beautiful sunset, then it’s well worth setting aside an additional 10 minutes during golden hour on your wedding day. 

groom leads bride wearing jumpsuit along pavement littered with autumnal leaves

For example, if you wanted to have you couple portraits on the way to your reception venue (which is both time efficient allows for a variety of portrait locations) then you should schedule to leave your ceremony venue at 3.15pm and arrive at your reception venue at 3.45pm – assuming that it takes 10 minutes to travel between the venues and giving yourselves 20 minutes for couples photos and the chance to have a breather.

bride and groom stand laughing out loud outside the front of a green and yellow double decker bus

Wedding Breakfast Timing

Your food is usually one of the big focal points of your wedding day. Your caterer will be able to advise you on how long the food service will take from start to finish. They will also need to know roughly what time you want the service to start. So if you want to have a lot of activity (like group photos) between the end of the ceremony and the beginning of the food service, let them know so that they can help guide you on what time the food service should start.

wedding guest bites in to burger at pink themed wedding

It’s worth remembering that some things wrap around the food service also take up time. If you want to have a receiving line to meet all of your guests as they go in to dinner, then you should allocate about 30 seconds per guest to estimate how long a receiving line will take. Guests also need a bit of time to actually find their seats at a wedding – they need to find their names on the seating plan, find their table and then their seat. I would recommend to allocate between 15 and 30 minutes for guests to be fully seated after being called for dinner. 

For example, you many want to schedule the start of your wedding food after all your guests have had a chance to settle in to your reception venue and enjoy a drink. If everyone has arrived at the venue by 3.45pm, has 30 minutes to settle in and are then called to dinner at 4.15pm and are then fully seated with the first course on the tables at 4.30pm.

groom stands at the bar of a pub wedding with dad drinking pints of beer

How Long Should a Wedding Speech Be?

There’s no strict rules with how long a speech ‘should’ be, and this is one part of the day that you fully control! From hearing many wedding speeches over the years I would recommend to ask your speakers to keep their speeches to a maximum of 10 minutes long. Especially if you are having a lot of different speakers. While the speeches are very often the most entertaining part of the day (and what gets talked about as people reminisce about your wedding), guests can get a bit fidgety and distracted if an individual speech goes longer than 10 minutes.

For example, if you have your speeches after the main course has been cleared, but before the dessert is served, then you may want to schedule the speeches to start at 6pm. If three people speak then they should finish by 6.30pm, after which the dessert is served. 

asian bride in purple and pink wedding sari giving a speech as husband looks on

Cake Cut and First Dance Timings

If you’re cutting a cake, or a stack of cheese, then that actual moment doesn’t take very long at all – usually between 5 and 10 minutes, depending on whether you want your guests to crowd around and cheer, or whether you want it to be a simple and intimate moment. The lengthy task is actually the cutting up of the cake / cheese – which is thankfully done by your catering team!

bride struggles to cut cake tower with groom at clapton roundhouse wedding

If you are having a first dance (not everyone does!), it’s another speedy ritual that takes less than 5 minutes. But it can be a great way to mark the start of the most fun part of the wedding – the party!

For example, if your dessert is cleared away at 7pm, then you may want to mark the end of dinner by cutting the cake at 7pm. Then clearing the dining room and meeting your evening guests from 7.30pm, and getting your party started with a first dance at 8pm.

bride and groom welcome guests on to dance floor after first dance at Shustoke Farm Barn Wedding

Other Wedding Day Schedule Considerations

This schedule won’t suit every wedding, but hopefully it gives you a rough idea of how long individual elements of your wedding actually take. If you are getting married at one venue, where single rooms will need to be turned around by venue staff, then you should also build that turnaround time in to the plan for the day (you will thankfully save time and money by not having to travel between venues!). Getting married at a single wedding venue generally means that you have the help of a wedding coordinator who will able able to assist with timing. Alternatively you can also hire in help just for the day, and an ‘on the day wedding coordinator’ is a really effective use of your money to assist in everything running smoothly while you concentrate on having fun!

wedding guests hold white shoe up in the air on wedding dancefloor at ikon gallery wedding

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Guide to choosing a wedding photographer

Guide to choosing a wedding photographer

YAY! If you’re reading this then the chances are that you’re at my favourite stage of the wedding planning process – choosing your wedding photographer! While I am a wedding photographer, I’m super passionate about couples booking the photographer that’s right for them and their wedding. So I’ve written this guide to help you reduce the overwhelm of choosing a wedding photographer. After all, there are so many of us, and so many of us are absolutely flippin great!

How to choose a good wedding photographer

I get it, it’s hard even on a website to know who will be the right photographer for you, but there are things to look for that help make the choice a lot easier. When you have found one the first thing you want to check is their portfolio.

Always thoroughly check out the wedding photography portfolio

I know it’s fairly obvious that you should check out a wedding photographers portfolio to see the very best of their work, but it’s also worth reviewing it with critical eyes. Look for consistency in both the kind of photo and editing style. When looking at the portfolio if you see images that look like they could have been photographed by 4 different people, the chances are they could have been and a lack of consistency can raise the red flags. An experienced photographer develops a signature style that can instantly be recognised in all their photographs. When you choose a wedding photographer that has a consistent style, you are going to be more certain about what your wedding photos will look like.

Read their “About Me” page

The person you choose is going to be capturing your wedding day – and probably all day too! You need to get to know them as a person. Your photographer is with you on a very emotionally charged and intimate day, and you want to make sure you have a good bond and trust the person. Take a look at their About Me page, read about them, get to know them and what they stand for. Do you have similar values? Do you believe in what they are trying to do? Do they sound like they would fit in with your friends and family?

bride and groom standing chatting to wedding guests on london street

Read their wedding photography blog

Lots of photographers use their blog to share super helpful and informative content to help you and your wedding, but also insight into their recent work too. Take a look at their blog and the advice they share, their experiences and the recent weddings they have shot. From reading their blog you’ll be able to tell if that person has lots of experience, how knowledgeable they are and you’ll see more of what their photos are like. You can check mine out here. 

Check out their Social Media profiles

Another way to get to know your photographer is by looking at their social media profiles – Instagram and Facebook can give great insight into their days, how they shoot weddings and some fun behind the scenes too. However, just keep in mind that just because a photographer doesn’t use social media channel, doesn’t mean they’re not any good. They might simply not use social media!

Hopefully that’s given you some helpful pointers on what to consider when choosing a wedding photographer. If you want to know more about the process and get a super handy checklist, then leave your email below for my completely free MEGA GUIDE. 

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