How to find and book a wedding cake maker

How to find and book a wedding cake maker

How to find and book a wedding cake maker

The idea of choosing a wedding cake may be one of the parts of wedding planning you’re most excited about, and totally understandably. Good cake is literally one of life’s greatest joys – as are weddings – so put those two hands together, and what do you get? AMAZING WEDDING CAKES.

 

But having said that, choosing a wedding cake can be a difficult process. It needs to look great and tie in with the vibe and theme of the day, it needs to survive the logistics of the day (transport, set up and weather) and it absolutely non-negotiably needs to taste incredible too. How do you find a wedding cake maker who’ll tick all these boxes for you and more? Well, that’s where I can help. I asked two amazing wedding cake makers for their advice on choosing a wedding cake, and in the process got all the wedding cake tips you’re searching for. Before I hand over to the experts for their advice, may I proffer some of my own – you might need a slice of something delicious to help you read this as your tastebuds will be going wild!

What should you look for when choosing a wedding cake maker?

 

Sarah from Tiny Sarah’s Cakes has 2 key pieces of advice for choosing a wedding cake maker. “First, you should be looking out for someone who could be your friend,” Sarah explains. “I highly believe that you should only hire people as your wedding suppliers if you feel like you belong to the same gang. Your wedding is one of the most emotionally charged day of your life, so you should make sure you spend all the time prepping for it and eating or enjoying the results of that prep with the best people. It’ll make you feel comfortable, relaxed, and safe – especially when it gets tough and stressful.

 

“My second piece of advice for this question – someone whose style you go WOW for. It’s easy to make the same decisions as your friend who got married a year before you, or what you’ve seen on pinterest, but trust me, there’s so much more to wedding cakes than naked cakes – it’s obviously totally fine if that’s what you want, but most couples who enquire about them do because they don’t really know what is possible! Cake makers are basically edible artists and you shouldn’t ask someone who specialises in buttercream and fresh flowers to make you a fondant cake with lace details.”

 

Laura from The Cake Spa also points out that you should “Always check they are registered with the council, have a good hygiene rating and have insurance. It also helps to look for businesses in your area, as generally they will need to be local to the venue!”

Where can you find a wedding cake maker that suits your wedding?

 

Lucy from Lil’s Parlour suggests Instagram as the first port of call of wedding cake ideas. “Social media is a great place to start. Most of my wedding clients come through Instagram because they like my style.” To fully maximise your Instagram searching (because we all know what a time thief that app can be), think of hashtags that could describe your wedding aesthetic as well as whereabouts in the world you’re getting married. #weddingcake may give you ideas, but it probably won’t seem like so much help when you fall in love with a design exclusively made by a fondant artist in Kuala Lumpar. Instead, try searching things like #weddingcakebirmingham or #kawaiiweddingcake.

 

Laura also suggests searching your other suppliers’ profiles as a hack to find well-suited wedding cake makers near you. This is true for all social media, as she explains: “Your venue should be able to put you in touch with trusted suppliers, and you would hope their style would be inkeeping with the venue, and therefroe your wedding!” So get scrolling through their photos to see what impresses you and who’s credited to it.

 

Another good place to look for wedding cake ideas is on wedding blogs. “If a wedding blog suits your wedding style, then browse who they’ve already featured! Chances are you’ll find different styles of cakes that all work within that certain aesthetic – you’ll have plenty of inspiration and a list of people to contact.” Sarah explains.

 

And, as Lucy points out, don’t forget about word of mouth and ye olde wedding fairs – if you find a wedding fair with a good style that matches yours, it’s always nice to go along to meet people face to face.

How far in advance do you need to book your wedding cake?

“This obviously depends on a few things,” Sarah explains, “for example, if that cake maker works alone (most do) or have a team of people, if your wedding is during summer and the busier months or quieter, and the cake maker itself. I think the earlier the better to enquire – if it is too early, they will just let you know! I can get booked up up to six months in advance, and already have dates booked for next year.”

 

Lucy agrees with the mantra of booking the sooner the better. “I would say as a rule 8-12 months before the wedding is the “golden time” to get your cake sorted. Some brides are super organised and like to get booked in several years in advance which is brilliant, but it can sometimes be difficult to do an accurate quote as with the current financial climate in the UK prices are changing so quickly. On the other end, I have fitted people in at really short notice – there’s no harm is asking!”

 

Laura’s guidance is the same – and she says, regardless of what type of supplier you’re thinking of, the best advice is to get them booked asap if you love them.

How should couples deal with guests that have very specific dietary requirements?

Both Sarah and Lucy say that a good wedding cake maker should be able to cater for specific dietary requirements. They both actually specialise in vegan wedding cakes (and, as Sarah points out, if you have a good cake maker you won’t be able to notice a difference in tastes between different dietary options!) “In my experience, I think asking your guests honestly is the best way forward.” Lucy says. “I do however express that it’s YOUR day and you should have what you want. For example, a couple I worked with were going to have their whole cake made with gluten free ingredients for the sake of one guest. It really wasn’t what they wanted and after a lot of chats we all decided that a cupcake for that person would suffice. The guest was thrilled.”

 

Sarah also suggests a smaller additional version in these kind of situations – especially in the case of gluten-free wedding guests, as she explains. “Whereas making a nut free cake wouldn’t cost me more, gluten free flour is veeeery expensive, so I suggest a gluten containing cake  as the main cake and a smaller cutting cake that is gluten free. That way, when plates arrive, the gluten free people have visually the same dessert as others, and it hasn’t cost a crazy amount extra either. I am personally always very touched when people think about me at events and if I’m not singled out, even better!” Sarah’s website also has quite an in-depth section on allergy info to ease any anxiety, which is super helpful. https://www.tinysarahscakes.co.uk/allergy-friendly-cakes/

 

And if you’re worried about flavours, Laura says “I tell couples to pick flavours for them, not for the masses as its their day.”

What makes a fun wedding?

“For me, fun is all about being yourself and singing to your own tune. Your day is about you and your partner, so have what YOU want and the fun will happen automatically!” Lucy recommends.

 

“SO many things,” Laura says, “but personally I think losing the traditions and just doing what you love to do! Drink, dance, be merry, sing, glitter, games, live music, confetti, cake! I love to add fun to my wedding cakes with a cheeky cake topper or some rude phrases on biscuit favours!”

 

“Having activities and various ways to break the ice between people who don’t know each other is fun!” Sarah suggests. “We had loads of board games so people sat together and played together – and we also had a buffet and no staff so everyone took turn washing the dishes, serving food and drinks, and setting stuff up!”

What do you wish all couples knew?

Brace yourselves, team – we’re about to not only hit you with our rhythm stick, but with two waste-reducing, budget-conscious wedding tips. Don’t say I don’t treat you, okay?

 

“I wish all couples knew that dummy cakes are an awesome way of having those 4 tiers without waste.” Lucy says. “They also cost slightly less – and no one knows the difference. You could claim I am a terrible sales woman but I always express to my couples that less is more!”

 

Laura’s about to burst another myth too – “Naked cakes aren’t that much cheaper in the grand scheme of things, despite what everyone thinks!” she reveals.

 

And from pre-wedding to post-wedding, as Sarah learned this from her own day. “You will forget things that happen on that day, because there is so so much to take in. My best piece of advice is to write EVERYTHING that happened and that you remember on the day after your wedding. You will be so glad you did a few years later when you read that – all the little jokes, all the hugs, all the tears. That moment in the toilet when everyone was removing their make up, or the one your sibling held you tight and told you they loved you.”


Tiny Sarah’s Cakes is a Reading-based bakery specialising in utterly unique and beautifully breathtaking vegan wedding cake designs. “I love making kawaii cakes but also art-inspired ones; my inspirations range from Van Goth to My Little Pony… I also love working with fresh flowers but I like to make cakes that are different. I am a massive texture and paint geek so I love incorporating that in my cakes too.” Check her website out for a) stunning vegan cake designs with the cutest fondant decor b) an about page you’ll fall in love with and c) loads of great info and helpful wedding cakes tips.  https://www.tinysarahscakes.co.uk


The Cake Spa is a Midlands-based bakery producing modern, stylish cakes often with an industrial or urban feel. Laura gets a lot of inspiration from raw materials, buildings, structures and textures. She lives by the motto that  “Your wedding cake and its display should be a bit different, something people haven’t seen before that makes it a talking point, memorable and a feature of the day. So whether that’s a cheeky topper, a black cake or a cake on a swing, people will talk about it for years to come!” She also has a facebook group, The Insider Bride Guide, full of useful tips and resources for couples getting married. https://www.thecakespa.co.uk/


Lil’s Parlour is a Birmingham-based bakery with a focus on the good life. Using only the best ingredients, Lucy’s buttercream creations and baked goods are fun, contemporary, and very very tasty! As well as making delicious wedding cakes, Lil’s Parlour can do mobile pop up tea parties in traditional vintage or super cool Mid Century Retro style.  http://lilsparlour.co.uk


 

How to find a wedding planner (and do you need one?)

How to find a wedding planner (and do you need one?)

So, now you know the difference between planners, stylists and co-ordinators thanks to my handy guide, the next question on your lips is probably ‘Do I need to find a wedding planner?’. I chatted to my crack squad of planners and experts to discuss all of the important questions when hiring a wedding planner: what to look for when hiring one, how much they cost, and why they’re important. Take it away, ladies…

What should you look for when hiring a wedding planner?

Firstly, it’s important to find a planner who’s style suits the day you’re looking to have. Ellen from LND Events explains: “You will have to spend a good chunk of your time with them and even if it’s just your wedding day that you’ve asked them to coordinate, that’s still asking a stranger to be part of your special moments! Most should offer a non-obligation meeting of sorts, so don’t be afraid to contact a few, to see the difference in them and how you gel with them.”

This means getting on with them personally – like Lianne from Blonde Army says, “Having someone who you ‘click’ with is so important so that your working relationship is clear and strong. How great is it when someone just second guesses everything you’re thinking? That’s the kinda relationship I look for when meeting my couples.” But also, it means liking their style aesthetically, as Michaela from Clear Hearts Planning details. “I would look for words on their website or Social Media that relate to you and your partner! Images that catch your eye and make you think about how fun your day would be if these planners were part of it. We know exactly who our super cool, badass clients are so when you go on the Clear Hearts website or Insta you will probably see images you love.”

 

Laura from Devine Bride says you can’t overstate the importance of good testimonials either. “If they don’t have any on their website or on their Facebook page, this is a big no-no for me (that goes for any wedding supplier, actually). Facebook reviews and Google reviews are un-editable by the business, so you know you’re hearing it from clients themselves, in their own words, when looking at either of these.”

Lianne also suggests getting recommendations from your other suppliers. “It may be helpful to work with someone who has previously worked at your chosen venue. They’ll have a better understanding of the venue’s restrictions, access etc and be able to guide you through design choices based upon their previous knowledge and experience. Plus, find a stylist and coordinator who is recommended by both clients and suppliers as you want to be sure they can both deliver your vision but also work well with the other suppliers you’ve booked.”

 

And Chenai from By Chenai says, as always, communication is key. “Always ask questions about experience and ways of working. I am by comparison to most, relatively new to the industry but I always offer references from past clients and venues that I’ve worked with. Transparency is important.”

How can you spot a good wedding planner vs a charlatan or a chancer?

 

“Wedding planning is not easy, and the job can be viewed as something that anyone could do.” Cherelle from Perfectly Planned 4 You warns. “Where possible meet with (or speak over skype) to the planner, and talk through your ideas for your wedding and see how they respond and help you. Most planners will provide a written quote; how quickly was that sent? How accurate was it? Do the ideas match up to what you’re thinking?”

Chenai also describes what kind of credentials you should be on the lookout for. “A good wedding planner has credentials; I don’t necessarily mean degrees but references. Do they have venues or clients who can vouch for them? Not all planners have Companies House listings but they should have a credible store front (website, social media presence, directory listings). Basically, can you see evidence of their work? I’d also ask if they have insurance documentation as this is required to operate in most venues. Plus, an affiliation to associations such as UKAWP or NAWP are also indicators of credibility and integrity. Also, look out for someone who doesn’t formalise your agreements by way of a contract – don’t give money over to anyone who will not agree to a contract.”

 

When looking for images of their work, Elinor Softley of Inner City Weddings says looking for authenticity is key. “Look for planners who post pictures of their actual work rather than constantly posting other people’s ‘for inspo’. (Instagram has A LOT to answer for… but I do love it in so many other ways)”.

And on the topic of images, Lianne says don’t be afraid to dig deeper. “Always ask to see their portfolio of work – check out their website and social media as they should be keen to show off their work. If they only show a selection of their own images online ask to see the full portfolio from a particular wedding or editorial; that way you can see the full design concept they designed and executed and not just ‘the best bits’. Also, ask them about their previous experience. I’m quite new to the industry so my portfolio is still growing but I’ve been working in events for over 10 years so I very much know my stuff! Often a different background can bring a fresh perspective to wedding planning so it’s always good to ask – and you may find some common ground which makes for a stronger working relationship!”

 

And if you find someone you really, really love? Just go with it. “I’m a massive believer in going with your gut instinct. Don’t feel that you need to go with the flashiest, most impressive website. Planning a wedding is such a personal thing, my best advice is to work with a planner who you gel with and understand your vision.” advises Cherelle.

Do I need to hire a wedding planner?

“There seems to be an increasing misunderstanding causing couples to think they don’t need a wedding planner because the venue is providing one,” Ellen says. “However, venue managers or wedding teams are there to make sure your day runs smoothly once you arrive at their establishment. Personal planners are there to do so much more. The two can work together well but I have experienced independent planners being told their services aren’t needed because the venue will help, only to hear the couple have been stressed out because there wasn’t as much help as they first envisaged.” This is especially true if you have 2 venues but even if you only have one, it’s a whole different kettle of fish!

How much does a wedding planner cost?

How long is a piece of string? It all depends on what kind of service you’re looking for and what the day entails. “Much like the range for photographers, it varies hugely.” Elinor explains. “It’s always best to contact the folk you like the look of to discuss your needs and get a bespoke quote. Some planners do coordination only options and ad hoc advice sessions for a few hundred quid, some only take on weddings of a certain budget with a minimum fee. We have pop up wedding prices for certain venues, and go bespoke for others.”

 

Michaela details the two main ways planners can charge. “A wedding planner can cost either a flat rate or a percentage of your total budget. I decided to have mine as packages (with names like The Ozzy and Sharon and Johnny and June) as a guide which are easy to find on the website and then couples can add extras on depending on their requirements.”

Chenai suggests a ballpark figure for those with spreadsheets out ready and raring (but remember, it is all somewhat bespoke as no 2 weddings are the same!) “For a full plan (i.e helping you from start to finish) you can look at 12%-15% of your total budget spend. My services are completely bespoke so I give 12% as an indicator and I have a minimum fee. If you consider that a wedding takes anywhere from 200 -300 hours to plan, planners’ rates are normally reflective of this time and volume of work required up to and including the day.

 

On the day coordination services are usually charged at a day rate and in my observations, the  scale varies from £450 – £1000 depending on what help is needed on the day and duration of time. For partial or final few weeks planning, for those couples who have done the majority of their planning but want someone to get them over the line, it varies in price. You can expect to pay up to half the cost of a full plan but this will vary on how much the couple have already arranged themselves.”

 

And remember, as Cherelle points out – “A wedding planner can help you get the most out of every pound you spend!”

When should you book your wedding planner?

“For Full Wedding Planning, I think between 18 months and a year in advance is ideal.” April from Kook! Events says. “But for On The Day Coordination, I would say a year or less before the wedding – I’ve had a booking 2 months out for On The Day Coordination before, but often if you’re getting married on a peak season summer date it’s better to get in there early doors so you can snap them up!”

 

Whilst shorter timeframes can be worked with – Elinor says she’s worked with everything from two months to three years – you do run the risk of your preferred planner not being available. “If you have your heart set on someone and you leave it until a few months before your day, don’t be surprised if they’re already booked.” advises Ellen. “People look over a year ahead for their venue and so a planners diary will start to have requests of the same nature. You also need to be prepared that if you are asking them to fully plan a wedding with not much notice, they might need to adjust their pricing to reflect the added pressure of workload.”

Bunch of babes, aren’t they? Check out my blog post to find their top tips for fun weddings, from the wedding planning experts themselves!


If a cool-as-fuck fairy godmother of weddings existed, it would be Cherelle from Perfectly Planned 4 You. She is the QUEEN of Hackney weddings, with the kind of knowledge you only get from a local, and her wonderful no-nonsense attitude means she’s the perfect person to bring your wedding day together. Website: https://www.perfectlyplanned4you.com

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LND Events help take Yorkshire weddings from “how” to “wow” and their wedding planning prowess is just as wonderful as their tagline. With a focus on telling your story and making total magic, Ellen is 100% committed to making your wedding day exactly what you dream of it being. http://www.lnd-events.co.uk/


A lot of the coolest wedding venues are blank canvas spaces, which makes the vision of your wedding all the more exciting but the execution even more bloody terrifying. If you want someone you can trust to take your dreams for the day and make them happen non-negotiably, Inner City Weddings are your guys. They’re less chair covers and sashes and more hauling-6-chairs-at-a-time to transform empty spaces into uber cool wedding venues. https://www.innercityweddings.co.uk/


In her own words, Michaela from Clear Hearts Planning offers alternative wedding planning for “awesome freaks, geeks, weirdos, metallers, punk rockers, and hip hoppers”. If you’re planning an alternative wedding and want someone who’ll not only understand your vision but exactly why it’s important that you have it that way – plus someone who’s super wonderful and will support you through every step – then she is your gal. http://www.clear-hearts.com


If the idea of a wedding planner seems terrifying, we all but guarantee that Laura from Devine Bride will change your mind. The country’s first and best specialist in pick and mix wedding planning, you can (would you believe) pick and mix the elements of wedding planning that you want help with and hand them over to Laura, whilst keeping control of the bits you’re actually enjoying. http://www.devinebride.co.uk/

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To do their job properly, wedding planners have to have a super practical, logistical mind – and to do their job well, they should be super lovely and easy to gel with. By Chenai ticks both of these boxes tenfold – she’s an incredibly inspiring lady who you’d be as comfortable meeting for a cocktail as you would having her in charge of your wedding day. Her luxe London style isn’t about gilded gold and more for the sake of it, but about meaningful moments. https://www.bychenai.com/


If you’re considering a wedding stylist or coordiinator but you’re not 100% sure you need one, we need to do nothing more than refer you to  the fab Lianne from Blonde Army events. Just think, if she takes this much care with answering some blog questions – just IMAGINE how good she’d be on your wedding day, right?! And don’t be misled by the title either – alongside being a coordinator, Lianne is a fabulous wedding stylist, orchestrating good-looking great-feeliing celebrations. https://blondearmy.co.uk/


If you like the cut of my jib then why not sign up to my exclusive Club Tropicana to get the low down on everything you need to know when planning a wedding. Plus the first bonus is a free super useful guide on how to choose your wedding photographer.

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What is a wedding planner/stylist/coordinator?

What is a wedding planner/stylist/coordinator?

If your only encounter with wedding planners is J-Lo and Monica Geller, it’s understandable that you might be a little confused about what they actually do. Throw into that the fact that wedding coordinators and wedding stylists also exist, and you’re probably very confused. What do they mean? What do they do? Why you do need them?!

A lot of wedding planners, stylists and coordinators use the terms somewhat interchangeably, which can add to the confusion – but don’t sweat, pet. The roles are often slightly more defined within them, helping you work out what it is that you want help with in the run up to and on the day itself. Being a wedding photographer lucky enough to work with some incredibly cool couples means I often work in tandem with equally cool wedding planners, stylists and coordinators, so I’ve asked the best of the best from London, the Midlands and Yorkshire to help. This should help clear up the confusion and explain what they do and, crucially, how they can help you. And not a headset in sight, team!

 

What is a wedding planner?

I think it’s fair to say that a wedding planner is the overarching term for a supplier who’s job it is to make your wedding day run smoothly. They can cover a number of different tasks within their remit – from full planning from day one, to last minute pulling together.

As Cherelle from Perfectly Planned 4 You, Hackney wedding planning specialist, explains, “This is a very good question, one that I feel many couples are confused about. From wedding to wedding, my job is never the same. But my main job is to help my bride and groom to have the best wedding planning experience possible.” This means she offers everything from Full Service Design and Coordination to Day of Coordination and many other options that fall in-between, including finding your suppliers – all the jobs that need to be done to give you more time to enjoy your engagement.

Ellen, founder of Leeds-based LND Events, says “A dedicated wedding planner should be able to do as much or as little as you want. Most offer different packages to suit couples needs, as of course every couple is unique in their tastes and choices, but essentially we are there to guide you in your decision-making so you end up with the right suppliers for your day, the right look and feel for your day, and to make sure it runs efficiently so all you have to do is enjoy it.” Not much then, hey?!

 

As she’s the go-to gal for warehouse weddings in Sheffield and Manchester, Elinor from Inner City Wedding does a lot of venue work as part of her role as a wedding planner. “We recommend spaces and suppliers (most of which don’t have wedding venue coordinators and are multi purpose spaces), and we have a huge amount of infrastructure we hire out, and assist in logistics and operations of weddings and events. We help our couples make the most of their budgets, collaborate on creative design ideas and implement those ideas, hook them up with awesome small businesses and independents, help set up, help coordinate it and pull all of the brilliant elements together! We also pack down post event as that is the shittest job in the world with a post-wedding hangover.” Woman of the people…

Regardless of what your planner specialises in, the purpose of a wedding planner couldn’t be clearer: the focus is on making the day totally stress-free and enjoyable for you and your family. Michaela from Clear Hearts Planning, a wedding planning service for awesome alternative couples, offers everything from controlling the entire budget and creating a quirky wedding from scratch to a few hours of venue styling, or inspiration sessions to recommend the perfect vendors. “I’ve found with my couples wedding planning can sometimes seem overwhelming at first BUT planning with someone who has worked at venues or knows other suppliers can make it all seem easier. Even in initial conversations, I’ve realised that I know bands or cake makers or venues that would be completely perfect for couples that they may not have found on their own (or would have spent hours searching for).

 

“We can also create bespoke packages that include a little bit of whatever you need to get your wedding and all the details ready — It’s all about making the day as stress free as possible – turning oh no’s into hell yeahs! The last wedding we coordinated the couple wanted to walk into a specific song and my team and I were on hand to make sure that moment was timed perfectly. These coordinated small details become much less scary when there is a team to ensure them than relying on the bridal party or family. Guests (and the couple) can party the day away without worrying.”

Devine Bride takes this one step further with her specialist ‘pick n mix’ wedding planning. (It’ll be a kilogram of jazzies and chocolate raisins for me please, no further questions.) “Pick + mix wedding planning is your wedding your way; I offer a much more flexible and creative way for couples to plan their big day. With my services, couples can pick and choose exactly what elements they need help with. From getting help with selected parts, as a consultant, or on a more ad hoc basis. My vision is to make wedding planning accessible and flexible. I offer creative solutions to planning and budgeting in the form of wedding tasking, styling and coordination. I offer a variety of different helping hand services, including but not limited to; Styling + Set Up, On the Day Coordination/Wedding Day Management, Partial Planning, and Hire a Bridesmaid.”

And Chenai, of the eponymous London luxury wedding planners By Chenai, describes her role as a wedding planner as an advocate. “A wedding planner’s job is to help their clients deliver the wedding they want. They are your personal wedding manager, saving you time by undertaking tasks such as researching venues, suppliers, arranging appointments and keeping things to schedule and in budget. They interpret what you envision for your day and help you achieve it. A great wedding planner remains objective, where sometimes on the opinions of family and friends can cloud decision making or add unnecessary  noise. I always say I act as an advocate for my couples, be it in negotiations with suppliers, venues or tricky conversations with family members. They are there to ensure schedules are adhered to, details are considered but personally – I just want to ensure my couples have a truly lovely day.”

What is a wedding coordinator?

Wedding coordinators most often sit within the realm of wedding planners. They focus on the on-the-day running of the wedding, but their work with you starts before that. Lianne, founder of London-based Blonde Army, explains “A coordinator helps to bring together all the elements you have planned towards the end of your planning journey.  You may have a co-ordinator included at your venue, or you may need a freelance coordinator like myself. I work with you for 1 whole month before your big day to ensure nothing is missed, creating a master schedule and liaising with all suppliers to ensure the day runs smoothly. Wedding coordinators take over communicating and organising, so that you can sit back and focus on yourself rather than on all the logistics of your wedding day..I’ll be there from the start of your wedding day to set up everything with precision and can be there until the very end to assist your guests and help with the clear up.”

What is a wedding stylist?

Ok, so we know what a wedding planner is. We’ve sussed the role of a wedding coordinator. But what’s a wedding stylist?

 

Lianne, founder of Blonde Army, says: “A wedding stylist deals with the aesthetics of your wedding. We help you work out how you want your wedding to feel and look. For me styling is about making it personal to you, the details, the guests experience and making it memorable to them and that’s a full sensory experience. We work for you – the couple – not the venue (even though we may have been recommended by them).  I’ll work with my recommended suppliers to source props & furniture to flowers & crockery and everything in between to create your dream day and execute your vision.

If a cool-as-fuck fairy godmother of weddings existed, it would be Cherelle from Perfectly Planned 4 You. She is the QUEEN of Hackney weddings, with the kind of knowledge you only get from a local, and her wonderful no-nonsense attitude means she’s the perfect person to bring your wedding day together.

Website  Instagram  Pinterest  Facebook


LND Events help take Yorkshire weddings from “how” to “wow” and their wedding planning prowess is just as wonderful as their tagline. With a focus on telling your story and making total magic, Ellen is 100% committed to making your wedding day exactly what you dream of it being.


A lot of the coolest wedding venues are blank canvas spaces, which makes the vision of your wedding all the more exciting but the execution even more bloody terrifying. If you want someone you can trust to take your dreams for the day and make them happen non-negotiably, Inner City Weddings are your guys. They’re less chair covers and sashes and more hauling-6-chairs-at-a-time to transform empty spaces into uber cool wedding venues.


In her own words, Michaela from Clear Hearts Planning offers alternative wedding planning for “awesome freaks, geeks, weirdos, metallers, punk rockers, and hip hoppers”. If you’re planning an alternative wedding and want someone who’ll not only understand your vision but exactly why it’s important that you have it that way – plus someone who’s super wonderful and will support you through every step – then she is your gal.


If the idea of a wedding planner seems terrifying, we all but guarantee that Laura from Devine Bride will change your mind. The country’s first and best specialist in pick and mix wedding planning, you can (would you believe) pick and mix the elements of wedding planning that you want help with and hand them over to Laura, whilst keeping control of the bits you’re actually enjoying. 

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To do their job properly, wedding planners have to have a super practical, logistical mind – and to do their job well, they should be super lovely and easy to gel with. By Chenai ticks both of these boxes tenfold – she’s an incredibly inspiring lady who you’d be as comfortable meeting for a cocktail as you would having her in charge of your wedding day. Her luxe London style isn’t about gilded gold and more for the sake of it, but about meaningful moments.


If you’re considering a wedding stylist or coordiinator but you’re not 100% sure you need one, we need to do nothing more than refer you to  the fab Lianne from Blonde Army events. Just think, if she takes this much care with answering some blog questions – just IMAGINE how good she’d be on your wedding day, right?! And don’t be misled by the title either – alongside being a coordinator, Lianne is a fabulous wedding stylist, orchestrating good-looking great-feeling celebrations.


Are you just getting started with wedding planning? You can sign up to my exclusive Club Tropicana to get the low down on everything you need to know when planning a wedding. Plus the first bonus is a free super useful guide on how to choose your wedding photographer.

Want to know more about my informal wedding photography?

Check out my portfolio

Read about me

Learn all about my packages

Contact me to chat more

Want to remember this blog post for later? Pin this image to your wedding planning pinterest board.

Everything you need to know about wedding planners stylists coordinators

What I need to know as your wedding photographer

What I need to know as your wedding photographer

So, the day is near! Once you have booked me to shoot your wedding I tend to leave you alone to crack on with your thing. I’m on hand to answer questions, but on the whole I tend to find that couples want to just get their date secured and then reconvene with me once all the plans are in place. I’m a very informal, documentary style photographer – so I’m all abut photographing your wedding, as it unfolds, rather than setting up shots. You probably won’t need my input in the early stages of your wedding planning, but I will need to know your plans inside and out once the day draws closer.

Bride and groom kiss during wedding ceremony at The Asylum in London. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

About 6 weeks before your wedding, I’ll send you a questionnaire asking some of the big questions I need to know for the big day (although none as big as the “I do”, obvs). It’s a really informal questionnaire, but it’s chocful of super important information so don’t skip it over. But also, don’t be scared by it – sit down with a coffee, tea, G&T or a vino and treat it like a fun date night amongst all the planning madness. (And a cheap one too, which is all the more welcome when you’re on wedding countdowns…). The best thing is, that all my booked couples get their own snazzy online client portal – so you can dip in and out of answering the questions on the form.

Bridesmaid wearing giraffe mask at fun wedding party. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

I’ll be the supplier that’s there the longest, and I have a very important job to do for you  (no pressure!) so I always want to ensure that we are on the same wavelength. That’s why this day details sheet comes in handy. I will constantly refer back to the plan throughout the day, leaving you and your beau to revel in the height of wedded thrills.

To give you an idea of all the exciting details I’ll be asking you, have a gander at the list below and start racking those brain cells/rummaging around in that wedding binder. Here’s my guide for What To Tell Your Wedding Photographer (AKA me)!

Groom leans in to mic during fun wedding speeches. Image by Parrot and Pineapple.

Contact details

I’ll need both contact numbers and email addresses for you and your partner. It’s helpful to have the basics on hand for any last minute messages. You’ll get both of mine too. Most importantly I’ll need both of your email addresses so that I can send you the email link to your finished set of wedding photos!

Venue

A pretty key one to start with, hey? A verified full address is always necessary – not just “my Dad’s farm” or “Citizen M”. I want postcodes, so I can Google Map that shizz and get exactly where you are with no hassle for you. It also helps me scout out potential locations for our portrait session to give you some relaxing celebratory time together on the day without taking you too far away from the party. If you’re having your day across two venues, make sure you include the info for both, plus the info for where you’re getting ready if I’m covering that too.

Bride and groom walk along city street after Islington Town Hall wedding. Image by Parrot and Pineapple.

Timings

Another thing on the list of absolutely non-negotiably need-to-know things is timings. My super informal, caught-in-the-moment style of photos actually require a lot of pre-planning. I will need to know where to be, when and what the intention is for the day. Then I can ensure I’m absolutely in the right place at the right time. 

Having these timings written down has twofold benefits: firstly, it’s good for me to know when all the ‘major’ events are happening, because although I’m constantly on the lookout for the best moments anyway, it’s good to know when things will be changing up. Secondly, it’s good to have the timings written down as I can then advise on when you’ve not allowed long enough for stuff (group photos!), or point out things you may not have thought of.

Bride and groom stand in front of St Pauls Cathedral. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography.

The important people

Now I am pretty rubbish with names! I do not take pride in this, so I’m going to try and blunder through getting names right by having a list of all the important people in advance. Knowing in advance who the key people are at your wedding will mean that not only will I be able to call them by their name, but I’ll also ensure that these people feature in your photos A LOT.

Bride hugs bridesmaid. Feminist wedding photographer. Image by Parrot & Pineapple Wedding Photography.

Group shot lists

Even though I’m all about the spontaneous fun and frolics that badass weddings bring, I totally understand that weddings are an opportunity to get together a group of people who don’t come together very often, and you may want to document that. Group shots are totally fine, but I do advise that we keep them as short as possible to maximise the amount you can enjoy your day and minimise the the time you’re stood with a fake smile wanting to be partying! For this reason I ask for a list of the group shots you’re looking for, itemised with the list of people you want in each one. It’s great if you can include both their relation and their name (this makes it easier for me to find missing people!)

I don’t have any rules around who you choose to have in any group photos (if you want them at all). Most couples tend to go for some combination of the following group shots:

  1. Both families and you and your partner
  2. Your extended family, you and your partner
  3. Your immediate family, you and your partner
  4. Your partner’s extended family, you and your partner
  5. Your partner’s immediate family, you and your partner
  6. The wedding squad, you and your partner

This list will take approximately 25 minutes to work through. If you want to add in other combinations, then you will need to allow for extra time. From my experience of shooting lots and lots of weddings, each combination of a group photo will take 3-4 minutes to organise and shoot.

It’s also super helpful if I can have an official helper from each side of the family – ideally someone who knows who the various different people. Doing so will save a lot of time!

Wedding party group shot in a green garden. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

The details

The devil truly is in the detail, and the marketing devil inside of me LOVES to have a solid brief before the job starts. I’ll ask you to describe what you have planned for your ceremony, and to describe what you have planned for the reception. I’ll need to know about any special surprises that you have planned too. If you’re going to let off confetti canons immediately after your first dance, then I’m going to want to make sure I’m in the best position all ready for that!

Red confetti r aining down on a bride and her friends at the wedding party. Image by Parrot and Pineapple.

Any beef

And I don’t mean guests’ dietary requirements – they should be directed to the caterer. Instead, it’s always really useful for me to know if there’s any tension in particular groups or with particular people as I navigate your guests. Context is important for photos! I come from a very modern family, with multiple sets of parents (that don’t talk to each other!) so I know that not every family is a straight-up nuclear scenario. 

Face time

Once this is filled in, I generally meet couples to have a chat about a month before the wedding day. Other than just having a lovely natter, it’s great to sit down and cement those plans, and talk them through in person. This leaves me feeling totally confident that I know exactly what you’re planning and wanting for the day, and most importantly should leave you feeling more relaxed, safe in the knowledge that someone else knows the nitty-gritty too. It’s a very informal chat where pets and children are welcome too. 

Guide dog licks the face of a wedding guest. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

 

If your plans change – don’t panic! This can and does happen. About a week before I’ll send you what I have as the final plan, to make sure that nothing’s changed since we last spoke. I then bring that with me (or an updated version with any changes) on the day as a crib sheet to refer back to. The final plan is by no means written in stone (it’s usually on my iphone actually), so if there are last minute changes and additions, that’s cool. 

Are you just getting started with wedding planning? You can sign up to my exclusive Club Tropicana to get the low down on everything you need to know when planning a wedding. Plus the first bonus is a free super useful guide on how to choose your wedding photographer.

Want to know more about my informal wedding photography?

Check out my portfolio

Read about me

Learn all about my packages

Contact me to chat more

Want to remember this blog post for later? Pin this image to your wedding planning pinterest board.

Poster showing the text 'What your wedding photographer needs to know'. By informal wedding photographer parrot and pineapple.

 

How to find and book a wedding florist

How to find and book a wedding florist

Flowers might be one of the first things that come to mind when you think of your wedding, but this doesn’t mean they need to be traditional – oh HELL no. There are a multitude of incredibly exciting, immensely experienced wedding florists looking to tear up the rulebook and flip the bird to tradition when it comes to alternative wedding flowers, whether that’s bouquets, buttonholes or installations. However, they are almost a science in themselves, so to dispel some of the mystery around them, I chatted to my favourite wedding florists to ask questions like what you should look out for when booking wedding flowers, a seasonal guide to wedding florals, and more.

Bride and groom stand next to double decker bus laughing. Brides holds bouquet. Image by Parrot & Pineapple Wedding Photography. Informal wedding photographer.

What should clients look for when choosing their wedding flowers?

Obviously, the first thing to look for is a wedding florist with a style you like – but how the hell do you go about this? Tracey from Campbell’s Flowers, a Sheffield-based florist oozing urban creative flair, guided us through some questions to consider. “It’s always a good idea to do a bit of homework and some light social media stalking! Narrow down your choice to ideally one or maybe two florists and then look at their websites.  For me, it’s usually about creativity, so do they look a good fit for you? If they have wall-to-wall examples of tight, ball-shaped bouquets and you’re a wild, ‘just-picked’ kinda gal, then you’re probably in the wrong place! Do they make you feel reassured? It’s totally fine working with someone who is new to the scene but the work needs to be professional and of a high standard. Do they seem to have a broad range of work? If you are looking for more than bouquets and buttonholes, do they have examples of installations and structures? Once you’ve answered these few simple questions, then get in touch and organise a meet up – don’t worry though, you’ll know for sure once you’ve met them if they are the right florist for you!”

Bride throws her bouquet in the air surrounded by 3 bridesmaids. Photograph by feminist wedding photographer Parrot & Pineapple

Emma from The Petal Studio also highlights what you should be looking for once you meet them (and even in the email or phone chats beforehand!) “I think clients need to be looking for someone who they can connect with, who’s as excited about their wedding as they are, who will listen to their needs, and simply be honest.” Caroline from Flowerology adds: “Rapport is just as much a consideration as trust. as they consider price. You are trusting your florist to carry out a very personal, very important job. You want someone you feel would be fun to work with, someone you ‘gel’ with. Key indicators can include things like how long does the florist take to respond to your enquiry? If they take long, then they are probably also too busy. Some florist take on more work than they can really handle to maximise profit. Do you really want to give that person your money, no matter how sought after their work is. Do you trust them?”

Bride poses with her parents and laughs. Image by informal wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

With regards to finding the actual floral style you want, Alice from Peonies from Pluto suggests hopping on Pinterest. “There are SO many flowers out there, I always suggest getting onto Pinterest and making the most flowery board possible. The more you look and pin, the more suggestions there’ll be for you. You’ll quickly find your board teetering towards particular colours, textures and shapes you prefer, but remember – flowers are seasonal, so be prepared that you may have to compromise!”

Bride and groom stand surrounded by guests. Bride holds larve rainbow coloured bouquet. Image by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography.

Jane from Dove & Myrtle’s advice is to look for seasonal flowers anyway. “Just like food, choosing seasonal ingredients is 100% best. During the growing season I work closely with some gorgeous chemical free flower farmers in Sussex and source as much from them as I possibly can for every event. Their flowers are second to none in terms of variety and fragrance and it makes me so happy knowing that the flowers I’m using are bee friendly, freshly cut and have only travelled a few miles up the road to my studio! Aside from seasonal blooms and foliage being at their absolute best and naturally most beautiful and fragrant the romantic in me loves that forever more the sight or smell of your wedding flowers appearing each year will take you straight back to your wedding day.”

Lady throws confetti over bride and groom. Bride holds simple white round bouquet. Image by fun wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography.

Where should you find a wedding florist that suits your wedding?

King-Wey from Alright Petal says that, when used correctly, instagram can be a super useful resource for finding your wedding florist. “Try searching hashtags of some typical wedding flower designs like #bridalbouquet, #tablecentrepiece or #flowerarch, or perhaps some of your favourite blooms. I would also recommend searching for florists by location, either within the area you live or close to your wedding venue so things like #londonweddingflorist, #eastlondonweddingflorist or #[insert venue name]florist for example. This way, venue visits and meetings will be easier to arrange.” Plus, as Alice points out, supporting a local small business is always a winner!

Bride hugs her mum while holding a rainbow coloured bouquet. Image by relaxed wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple.

And this leads us nicely onto wedding fairs! (I love it when a plan comes together. I’m in the right industry) Emma from The Petal Studio suggests wedding fairs are a great way to meet your florist. “There are some mega wedding shows about that are for the alternative bride, which is a perfect place to meet quirky wedding florists. Also, I would say check to see whether your venue has any wedding fairs booked, and go along to them!” Florists who’ve already worked in your space or are aware of it will have some awesome ideas for what they can do.

Green bottles with dried flowers on wedding breakfast table taken by Parrot & Pineapple Wedding Photography

Jane advises grabbing a mug of tea – check – and spending time looking through wedding directories too. “They’ve already done the legwork for you by selecting suppliers they believe their readers will love.  Also, why not ask another supplier you already have on board or a friend whose wedding flowers you admired? Referrals can be a brilliant way to find your perfect fit.”

 

How far in advance do you need to book your wedding florist?

This is a kind of how long is a piece of string question, as King-Wey points out, as it differs from florist to florist but also depending on your florist too. Jody from Don’t Settle Petal suggests about a year in advance is a good time: “Book as early as possible. I personally think 12 months is a great time. Your florist can confidently advise you of flowers that will be in season and their cost due to it being the same year! This can make choosing your wedding flowers really inspiring.” Emma points out that this also gives you opportunity to gauge prices and help with the wedding budget.

White and green floral arrangement on a table set ready for wedding breakfast. Image by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography.

But there are certain dates that can be trickier than others, as Tracey explains. Firstly, there’s wedding season to think about: “It’s really good to get in early if your wedding falls on Bank Holiday weekends. In these cases, you are looking at booking around 18 months to 2 years or so beforehand. For Summer weddings between  May – September I would say around a year to 18 months in advance; for October – April think 6 months to a year – but there aren’t really any hard and fast rules really! Most years our wedding season starts March and ends in December and it’s only really January and February where we just have one or two weddings.”

Orange ranunculus button holes. Image by london wedding photographer Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography.

But on top of that, there’s also florists’ peak period to think about! “Try if you can to avoid florists’ peak period too. Venues offer discounts during their quieter times but flowers are very expensive around Christmas, Valentine’s and Mother’s Day when our suppliers inflate the prices due to demand – so December, February and March can seem economical, but they’re not always! Also, a real favourite with couples at the moment seems to be booking weddings between Christmas and New Year. However, there usually aren’t any fresh deliveries until the 28th December, and the florist needs a day at least to work on them, so be warned, there will be limited choice!”

 

Having said that – don’t panic if you don’t have that time at your disposal! Many florists can and will take on bookings with a shorter time frame out of season or when they’re smaller jobs.

Bride and groom kiss outside church covered in confetti. Image by london wedding photographer Parrot and pineapple.

What do you think makes a fun wedding?

All of our incredible wedding florists (alongside essentially all the other belting suppliers I’ve asked in this interview series) said couples bringing their own quirky personalities in and saying sod it to tradition makes the most fun wedding. “I think the fun is in the details,” Tracey explains. “I’ve been asked to incorporate all manner of ideas from conjuring up scenes from “Moonrise Kingdom” for a Wes Anderson themed tipi wedding, to simply incorporating scrabble tiles onto buttonholes for a pair of ‘word nerds’ (their words, by the way!). For me it’s always about being given the freedom to express the couples’ ideas that creates the joy and fun that everyone notices at a wedding.”

 

On top of that, Jane heartily suggests cocktails. “I’m all for glitter bombs, the right music and killer cocktails – I mean, c’mon..who doesn’t love a Margarita fuelled 1am Mr Brightside session on the dance floor?” But, it must be stressed, only secondary to the whole authentic love thang above.

Greenery wedding decorations at a London City Wedding. Image by Parrot & Pineapple.

What do you wish all wedding clients knew?

Right, folk, don your berets because we’re about to do some MYTHBUSTING. Most shockingly, Tracey says she wishes couples knew that foliage isn’t cheap – SHOCK HORROR! “Seriously. I don’t know who told the wedding world that ‘greenery’ is cheap! If you want wall-to-wall eucalyptus in the Spring then it’s super expensive. All shrubs and foliage go through a natural growing season but when eucalyptus grows the tips are very soft and are damaged by cold very easily so they go black and look awful. Like ALL the materials I work with, including gypsophila (!), they go through periods of being expensive and hard to come by (also smelly if they are gypsophila but that’s another story). So nothing is ‘cheap’ – it’s just marginally less expensive than say a huge, gorgeous David Austin type rose!” Consider the world shook – if you’re looking for wedding flowers on a budget, it’s always best to let your florist guide you on what wedding flowers actually cost!

Red and pink bridal bouquet lying on a table. Image my Parrot and Pineapple.

In a similar vein, King-wey says, flowers aren’t cheap either – even for florists! – and Jody wants couples to know that they can be as involved in their wedding flowers design as they like. “No pressure – but just remember, don’t settle!” she says. (I see what she did there, and I like it.)

 

Emma says she’d also like to let people know that wedding flowers take TIME. In some cases, it can take up to a week to get all the details perfect, so it’s not something they just whip up. And for that same reason, Caroline wants couples to know that “For goodness sake, if you are going to do your own wedding flowers: at least attend a bouquet making workshop, so that you have half an idea of what is involved.” The events section of her website has upcoming dates, plus private 1-1 lessons on request.

White hydrangea floral arrangement at warehouse wedding. Image by Parrot and Pineapple.

Looking for more super mega useful advice to plan your wedding?

Then you should definitely check out the rest of my blogs in this series designed to cut the crap out of wedding planning.

I’ve asked all my favourite wedding suppliers all the awkward questions so you don’t have to.

Why not pin this image to your Pinterest board to remember it for later?

How to choose your wedding florist - advice from informal wedding photographer Parrot & Pineapple

Still looking for a fun, informal wedding photographer? You should check out my 4 minute video for a whirlwind review of all the weddings I shot in 2018. Or just drop me a line to fix up a little chat.


Campbell’s Flowers is an award-winning wedding florist in Sheffield, specialising in creating creative, exciting, flawless floral arrangements. Tracey’s passionate about finding new ways to enhance a venue and looking at it with fresh (geddit) eyes. She also has a super helpful section of her website which shows which wedding flowers are in season when, categorised by month – is she heavensent? We think so. https://campbellsflowers.co.uk/  


Although she’s based just outside of Tunbridge Wells, Alice from Peonies from Pluto is committed to making out-of-this-world floral arrangements. Her wedding flowers have a delightful quirky garden style, often with a rainbow twist. https://www.peoniesfrompluto.co.uk


Dove & Myrtle creates romantic, wild and natural floral arrangements for weddings from her studio in Hove. Jane’s all about the painterly and abundant with a hint of secret gardens, woodland floors and the Bohemian, and above all else LOVES colour and texture. Tumbling vines, twisting tendrils and deliciously scented fresh flowers, foliage and herbs are her favourite ingredients and she’s at her absolute happiest creating flowers that look freshly gathered or like they’re growing from wherever they’ve been placed. Check back in with her blog for more in-depth advice on your wedding flowers! https://www.doveandmyrtle.com/


The Petal Studio is a Leeds-based florists, creating quirky, friendly and passionate flowers. Their aim is to make every couple swoon over their flowers, with a loose and rustic feel. Keep an eye out on their blog for more super helpful advice for couples planning their wedding, from wedding flowers chat to beyond! https://www.thepetalstudio.co.uk


Flowerology is a Birmingham-based floral studio, specialising in wedding flowers that are wild, naturalistic, seasonal, and informal. Many of Caroline’s flowers are home grown in her beautiful cutting garden or on her allotment, and it’s this kind of talented hands-on approach that she’ll give from start to finish. https://www.flowerology.co.uk/


Alright Petal is a floral studio based in North London. Her style is seasonal, eclectic, romantic, and always with an element of surprise. We couldn’t have put any words in her mouth that were better than her own, so here’s King-Wey:  “There are so many wonderfully talented florists out there so it is getting increasingly challenging to find a genuine niche. However, passion is fundamental no matter what profession you are in. Without wanting to sound too cliché, I sincerely love what I do, and I hope this comes through in my work.” http://www.alrightpetalflowers.com


Don’t Settle Petal offers fearless floristry for Midlands-based couples. Other than having the best business name ever, Jody’s work is wild and bold, with a touch of 70s boho working in harmony with 80s neon. Doesn’t that just sound like the absolute dream? http://www.dontsettlepetal.co.uk/


 

How to stay sane during wedding planning

How to stay sane during wedding planning

Don’t be afraid to admit that wedding planning can be a tad stressful.

See, didn’t that already feel cathartic to say? And it doesn’t mean you’re being a bridezilla, in the slightest; it just means that the wedding industry doesn’t talk about the taboo of wedding planning stress nearly enough.

As a supplier who’s there for most of the process, I’ve compiled a guide on how to stay sane planning a wedding, hoping it offers you some much-needed wedding planning stress relief.

Ginger and White Cat sat near a pair of white wedding shoes - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Delegate

Delegate good times, c’mon! as the old song goes. Weddings are funny old things – as soon as you ask someone to be in your bridal party, you automatically want to assuage any stress they may feel on the day and so often you avoid giving them anything to do. Conversely, however, they’re often honoured to have something tangible to contribute, and also – don’t you deserve the same treatment?! If you’re feeling overwhelmed by everything that needs doing, play to your party’s strengths and delegate jobs out, whether little or large.

Labrador wearing a bright striped rainbow bow tie - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Let people know

Don’t be afraid to let people know you’re struggling a little; it’s not a sign of being a bad person, it’s a sign of planning an epic bash, and that takes some serious wo-manpower. This goes for the people close to you – let them know you’re under a lot of stress, and you would appreciate them being sensitive about the topic – and also people in your wider circles, who you can gently but firmly let know you’d prefer to talk about something else. A problem shared isn’t necessarily a problem halved, but it is a problem that feels immediately less thorny.

Dog stood in front of coloured graffiti wall wear a pom pom collar - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Take time out

This leads nicely onto my next point, taking time out (it’s almost like I planned it, hey?). If you’re feeling the pressure, take time out to find some wedding planning stress relief. As much as it may not feel like it, those fabric swatches and DJ requests can wait 12 hours – and who knows, the time away may bring you a genius revelation regarding the combination of mustard yellow and You Can Call Me Al!

Two basset hounds sat underneath a table at a pub looking at the camera - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Eat breakfast…

And lunch and dinner, for that matter! There’s information everywhere you turn on bridal diets and my personal hatred, shredding for the wedding, but there’s not nearly enough information about not dieting for the wedding, and instead making sure you’re nourished. Make sure you eat good food often, food that makes you feel happy and well and fulfilled, because looking after your body helps you look after your mind. Also, make sure you do actually eat breakfast on your wedding day, because all that bubbles and those nerves on a long day make for a looooow alcohol tolerance.

white and black cat staring at the camera while wedding dress hangs in the background on a book shelf - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Prioritise

One of the first things to do when wedding planning is work out your priorities (check the others out here). Keep these priorities in mind throughout the process, constantly going back to them and checking your worries against them. Is this high up on our list? No. Is it worth the stress I’m currently under? No. Might it be able to be relegated to another day, when I feel more up to it? Yes, with bells on.

Black dog standing in front of colour graffiti wall wearing a floral collar of yellow and purple flowers - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Move

Without getting all Bill Nye the Science Guy on you, exercise is a great form of wedding planning stress relief. Getting up and moving about releases endorphins that make you feel better and less stressed about these things. Whether it’s going for a run, having a ridiculous nobody-will-see-you 10 minute dance to power ballads or going for a walk to buy a 99 with a flake, the act of moving will signal to your brain that your stress needs to jog on as well.

Dog posing in front of green tiled wall with one paw up wearing a bright red floral collar - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Keep date nights

Keep date nights as date nights if time allows. With busy jobs and busy lives, wedding planning understandably often becomes date nights – because why are you even doing the whole thing if you don’t enjoy spending time together – but if your schedule allows it, carve some time out to just be yours with no wedding planning stress allowed. This can work twofold – as above, it gives your brain a rest from wedding planning nightmares, but spending time with your other half can also can make the planning process seem a little sweeter when you get back to it, having remembered what it’s all for.

two border collies wearing floral collars sitting in a pub - photo taken by Parrot and Pineapple Wedding Photography

Found this super useful? Why not pin it to your own wedding planning boards? Brill! Go right ahead. You can also follow me on Pinterest too for more inspiration.